Category Archives: Courses

Psychosis 4: Thought disorder

The third in the ‘big 3’ trilogy of psychotic symptoms is, for many people, the most difficult to understand. Unlike delusions which are all about ‘what’ we think, thought disorders are about ‘how’ we think. It is thought process, not thought content.

There are two main ways to identify thought disorders. Both rely upon the way that we represent thought symbolically to others. They are language, either written or spoken, and imagery. Let me explain what I mean by this…

To arrange training for your social care or mental health staff please complete the contact form below…

Psychosis 2: Delusions, illusions and hallucinations

Don't let yourself off the hook thumbnailPart 2 of the psychosis mini-series looks at delusions (AKA ‘Fixed, false beliefs – not amenable to reason’). Delusions are more than just vague ideas – they’re the things people hold to be most certain. Here we look at some of the ways that delusions form, the relationship between delusions, illusions and hallucinations and we begin to think about some of the ways that we can help delusional people.

I have long maintained that this connection is vital to our understanding of psychosis and yet not a word about it was uttered during my nurse training.The student nurses of 1992-95 never heard a peep about these vital links. The student nurses of 2017… well… We consider the role of memory and familiarity in perception and how the self-fulfilling prophecy of expectation can create mistakes, not only in our five senses but in the beliefs we form that so often rely upon that sense data to begin with.

If you’d like to arrange training for your staff please fill in the form here…

Introducing the cognitive model

Excuse the voice – I had a headcold when I made this. Hopefully it’s still clear enough.

This video outlines the basic idea behind the cognitive model and why, far from being beyond our control, human emotions, behaviours, situations and thoughts are entirely ours to manage and to master.

Beginning with the basic quadrangle of thoughts, feelings, physiology and behaviour we use different examples of situations that people find themselves in to demonstrate how making a change in any one of these four areas of experience can affect all the rest. Then we look at the role of core beliefs, conditional assumptions and the activating events for emotional and cognitive crises that don’t always make a great deal of sense either to us or to those around us.

By following the structure laid out in the cognitive model (the basis of CBT) we can understand precisely how people come to have the negative thoughts they have, what beliefs underpin their emotional distress and begin to see (often with surprising ease) just what to do about it.

That has to be worth 15 minutes of your time!

If you’d like to arrange training for your staff please fill in the form here…

Social and mental health care training

I’ve been getting a lot of new inquiries lately, which is wonderful. It seems that training budgets are becoming available to the small specialist trainers again without organisations having to rely upon the off-the-shelf generalists on their ‘pre-approved supplier lists’. There are many courses that only a specialist clinician can provide. Click below to download the Mind The Care brochure…

170429 Mind The Care brochure.

That’s great news for the little man like me. It means I can get to more organisations and train more staff from the perspective of the expert practitioner. Learning from someone who actually does the job is always better than listening to a training executive with a script.

So I thought I’d put a little post up for those organisations who haven’t experienced my training yet (and it is an experience), outlining my most popular courses and seminar topics and inviting them to get make contact. Just click here and I’ll be in touch to design the exact training or speaking programme you need to help you look after and get the best out of your care team.

Click here 170429 Mind The Care brochure to download Mind the care’s most recent brochure.

courses-meme

Introduction to Self Injury

This 1 day Introduction to self injury training course is only a basic introduction to the topic. It’s intended for social care workers who may or may not have any prior experience of the subject.

working-with-people-who-self-injureThe course challenges the prejudicial myths, value judgements and assumptions that surround self-injury and the people who habitually cut, burn or otherwise harm themselves. It offers practical guidance in working with people who repeatedly harm themselves without getting bogged down in unhelpful criticism and blame.

By comparing self harm to more ‘acceptable’ (but often more harmful) coping strategies like smoking, drinking or general impulsivity we normalise the action as a means of self-soothing before extending the comparison to less dramatic strategies like walking, bathing or even just watching a favourite film.

The aim is not to make participants experts. Rather the course is intended to remove prejudices and offer a simple explanatory model that isn’t based upon value judgements or unsupportable assumptions about manipulation or attention-seeking.

Click here to discover more about how Mind The Care Training can help you and your staff.

 

Mental health care needn’t be complicated

Training room.jpgI used to think that mental health care would be really complicated. So I looked for complicated theories to underpin everything I did. For many years I studied and tried hard to negotiate my way through the complex world of mental disorder. And because I looked for complicated answers, complicated answers were all I found. That was a great mistake.

The more I studied, the more I realised that good quality mental health care doesn’t need to be complicated. It may not always be easy to deliver but that doesn’t mean it should be hard to understand. Often the simplest solutons are the most effective.

Eventually I realised that there are some straightforward, basic principles that we need to follow. Everything else flows from there. These are the simple ideas that make the difference between good care and bad, between illness and recovery.

If only someone had distilled those principles for me when I first began. My early career would have been so much easier and more effective. But nobody did that in those days. That’s a great shame.

So I’ve done it myself. I’ve boiled down the basic ideas into usable, teachable concepts that every care worker can quickly understand and apply. These are the fundamental principles that underpin every Mind The Care Training course and seminar. Subscribe to this page and come back often to find out more.