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challenging behaviour human rights psychology safeguarding social care training tutorial video

Challenging behaviour: Validating opinions and beliefs

When dealing with people whose behaviours are challenging it’s important to acknowledge that those behaviours may well be based upon some very deep-seated beliefs. Whilst we don’t need to agree with or even support beliefs that cause problems it is vital that we acknowledge the person’s right to hold them – even if we deny their assumed right to act upon them. It’s one thing to object to behaviours – it’s quite another to dismiss the person who holds those beliefs.

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challenging behaviour duty of care law mental health psychology risk social care techniques training tutorial video

Challenging behaviour: Motivation and pleasure

Most people are surprised to learn that they maintain (and often actually create) the problems they face. Often people will work hard to resist this idea and that can be difficult to overcome but it’s worth the effort. Until people understand their own role in maintaining their difficulties they cannot really take responsibility for solving them. After all – if you don’t think you’re a part of the problem you won’t think that you need to change your behaviour to change it.

 

 

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Challenging behaviour: Philosophy and ethics

Challenging behaviour strategies aren’t necessarily complicated but they are powerful. It’s important then that we use them ethically. This video outlines some of the more basic points about ethics and philosophies of working with people who challenge us.

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challenging behaviour duty of care mental health social care video

It’s only behavioural!

Everything humans do is behavioural. There’s no justification for using the label to hide our own inadequacies or laziness.

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challenging behaviour duty of care mental health psychology social care techniques video

I don’t care: Belligerence and behavioural boundaries

Sometimes the only way to protect the therapeutic relationship is temporarily to behave as though you have no concern whatsoever for the other person’s point of view. This seems counter-intuitive and it most certainly doesn’t ‘feel’ good but how we feel is often far less important than what we do.

It’s important not to allow anyone to use our emotions against us in order to influence our therapeutic decision-making. That’s a form of emotional blackmail. It’s also a very common behaviour strategy that people use because it often works.

You probably won’t be able to stop someone using this sort of underhand strategy with others but you certainly can stop them using it on you. The trick is to show them that it won’t work and then invite them to bring something better to your therapeutic relationship instead.

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challenging behaviour mental health risk social care training tutorial video

Challenging behaviour: Do we need help?

This is the latest video in the ‘Challenging behaviour’ series/playlist.

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challenging behaviour mental health social care training tutorial video

Challenging behaviour

I’m developing a new video playlist on Challenging behaviour. See what you think.

My challenging behaviour stuff: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL59zKEzcDznaMz66vbIkbGOu3CtRXrxFQ

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Stoicism 4: My ponytail is ridiculous!

Here we build upon two earlier principles. Epictetus made it clear that we can only control our own thoughts, feelings and behaviours – not those of other people.

Marcus Aurelius taught us the 2 point maxim for dealing with abusive people…
1. Be the best me that I can be;
2. Be grateful that I’m not them.

Here we add another perspective from Seneca. Anger is only possible when the world doesn’t meet our expectations. If we adjust our expectations to reality the petty insults of others won’t hurt us at all.

In this, fourth Stoicism video we begin to show how it’s possible to layer Stoic wisdom, one point upon another to create a robust system of thought and attitude that really does defend us against those who seek to hurt, upset, anger or distress us.

 

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challenging behaviour mental health risk social care tutorial

Expectation

Care workers need to learn from past experiences.
The best predictor of future behaviour is past behaviour.
But the people we work with can change too.
The whole point of much of our work is to help them to change.
How can we balance past behaviours and future potential?
How do we promote change without becoming naive and vulnerable?

Complete the contact form below to arrange training for your staff.

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challenging behaviour human rights mental health risk safeguarding social care video

An interview with Freya Smith

Freya Smith is a carer and youth worker. She’s fluent in British sign language and sees all of life as an opportunity for compassion and for helping those in need.
 
Click the link to see Freya interviewed about her experiences working with homeless children on the streets of Cardiff.
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Freya’s enthusiasm is infectious. Her no-nonsense philosophy is practical and effective. To hear her speak about her work with some of the most disadvantaged children in the UK is to catch a small glimpse of what can be possible when we really engage with the task at hand.