All posts by stuartsorensen

Online seminars

Time’s running out.

Only 10 days to go before the next seminar (The picture on the box)

Read about this and other upcoming seminars on both self-harm and psychosis here…

Risk appreciation

Without risk life becomes empty, dull and lacking in quality. It’s not our job to remove all risk – we can’t anyway. Everything carries some risk. The trick is to learn to balance risk with reward, with benefits.

We do people no favours by trying to wrap them up in cotton wool to insulate them from all risk.

Reacting to self harm

It’s easy to become emotionally disturbed when faced with a service-user, patient or client who self harms. Workers feel bad for the patient and bad about themselves for not being able to prevent it.

Unfortunately this emotional response – an element of High Expressed Emotion (HEE) known as Emotional over-involvement can make things worse. Try this instead.

Online seminar 23rd Feb 2023

It’s like a big jigsaw – and it’s easier to understand when you can see the picture on the box!

What: 1 hour online seminar to show how #mentalhealth and disorder fit together  When: Thursday 23rd February at 7pm.
Where: Your choice.
Cost: £12.50

Don’t try to be perfect

It’s ok to be human. It’s OK to make mistakes. To be fallible.

Don’t make your #mentalhealth depend upon infallibility.

You can never be more than human and humans get stuff wrong. It’s inevitable and it’s OK!

The eternal ‘now’

the eternal ‘now’ aids mental health and helps us to be effective.

In this moment I am safe, I am warm, well fed and comfortable. It’s a good moment. I will not spoil this moment regretting the past or worrying about future moments.

I can take the time to plan for the future just as I have learned from the past but I will not allow the small number of genuinely distressing moments to overwhelm my life’s majority of moments like this one.

Control freaks have no life!

Many people try to control other people because they think it will help to keep them happy and mentally healthy. But actually the opposite is true.

Mental well-being depends upon a variety of experiences but control-freakery, in so far as it’s successful, limits a person’s experience only to what they already understand and can imagine. Most people find that their lives are enriched by the actions of others – even when those actions are surprising.

The more we control other people, the less we experience variety in life, the more frustrated and resentful we become when we fail and greater the risk we run of developing mental health problems.

Meaningful activity & mental health

The problem with distraction

Mental health nurses are encouraged to rely heavily upon distraction to help people manage anxiety, depression or the emotional consequences of past trauma. That’s OK so far as it goes but unfortunately it really doesn’t go very far.